IP Licensing Lesson: Don’t Copy and Paste, Ask and Talk

So people who know me, know that I love video games. So I was excited when I saw Disney’s movie trailer for Wreck-it Ralph, an animated story about a villain who gets tired of being a villain.  In the trailer, one of the signature scenes is the main character attends an AA-style meeting with fellow video games. The amazing thing about this is the sheer amount of characters from different video game companies that appear in this film.

I know many of you reading this may be like, why is that a big deal? It is a big deal because generally the process to secure licensing rights to use copyrighted material or a trademark is expensive and can be extremely time-consuming. However, this article by IGN.com, a site that focuses on mostly video games and other entertainment, interviewed the creators of Wreck-it Ralph. Be aware that characters in video games, cartoons, comic books, etc . . . sometimes have been both registered trademarked and copyrighted, as a strategy to create multiple layers of intellectual property (IP) protection.

I think there is a valuable lesson for business owners who do advertising, graphic design and content creation, and social media marketing in this quote:

But as the film started taking shape, rights issues eventually became a factor. “We went out and met with people in person, which I think is the key,” said Spencer. “When people came in for E3, we would actually meet with all of the companies and talk about the movie. From the very beginning we said, ‘We want to be authentic to your character. What we would like to do is put in an approval process where you look at our animation and you say that we’re being true to the character.'” As the creators noted, most companies were all for it.

Now, later in the article the creators do note there were some arduous processes, like double-checking with Nintendo if it’s characters were being represented accurately, but the lesson is clear ASK and TALK to the IP owner about what you want to do. This is the art of the sale and business deal, and I think authenticity goes a long way.

I have noticed recently many people are flocking to Slideshare to put up their presentations. I wonder, as I look through these well put together presentations, whether or not the people got the IP owner’s permission to use their images, logos, etc . . . . Did you talk to them? I realize it is easier to COPY and PASTE, but I will let you in on a little secret it is also easy to COPY and PASTE a CEASE and DESIST letter with a demand for damages.

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